Saving wonder. Recording my inspiration. Science.
starstuffblog:

Powerful, Pulsating Core of Star 

The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar — the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse — a rotating beam of X-rays, that like a cosmic lighthouse, intersects Earth every 0.2 seconds.

The pulsar, called PSR J1640-4631, lies in our inner Milky Way galaxy about 42,000 light-years away. It was originally identified by as an intense source of gamma rays by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in Namibia. NuSTAR helped pin down the source of the gamma rays to a pulsar.

The other pink dots in this picture show low-energy X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

In this image, NuSTAR data is blue and shows high-energy X-rays with 3 to 79 kiloelectron volts; Chandra data is pink and shows X-rays with 0.5 to 10 kiloeletron volts.

The background image shows infrared light and was captured by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO

starstuffblog:

Powerful, Pulsating Core of Star

The blue dot in this image marks the spot of an energetic pulsar — the magnetic, spinning core of star that blew up in a supernova explosion. NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, discovered the pulsar by identifying its telltale pulse — a rotating beam of X-rays, that like a cosmic lighthouse, intersects Earth every 0.2 seconds.

The pulsar, called PSR J1640-4631, lies in our inner Milky Way galaxy about 42,000 light-years away. It was originally identified by as an intense source of gamma rays by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in Namibia. NuSTAR helped pin down the source of the gamma rays to a pulsar.

The other pink dots in this picture show low-energy X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

In this image, NuSTAR data is blue and shows high-energy X-rays with 3 to 79 kiloelectron volts; Chandra data is pink and shows X-rays with 0.5 to 10 kiloeletron volts.

The background image shows infrared light and was captured by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAO

ivvvoo:

Sodium vapour by 42zx

ivvvoo:

Sodium vapour by 42zx

motionaddicts:

motionaddicts:

Swarm

Throwback Thursday

motionaddicts:

motionaddicts:

Swarm

Throwback Thursday

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus


  This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).
  
  Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.
  
  From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!
  
  To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).

Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!

To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

thedotisblack:

2014.7.12_16.47.21_frame_0002Made with Processing
Like it? Visit thedotisblack

thedotisblack:

2014.7.12_16.47.21_frame_0002
Made with Processing

Like it? Visit thedotisblack

afro-dominicano:

Milky Way above Atacama Salt Lagoon

Galaxies, stars, and a serene reflecting pool combine to create this memorable land and skyscape.

Image Credit & Copyright: Alex Tudorica (AIfA, U. Bonn)

The featured panorama is a 12-image mosaic taken last month from the Salar de Atacama salt flat in northern Chile. The calm water is Laguna Cejar, a salty lagoon featuring a large central sinkhole. On the image left, the astrophotographer’s fiancee is seen capturing the same photogenic scene.

The night sky is lit up with countless stars, the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud galaxies on the left, and the band of our Milky Way galaxy running diagonally up the right. The Milky Way may appear to be causing havoc at the horizon, but those are just the normal lights of a nearby town.

svff:

Doodle for the 2014 Perseid Meteor Shower. Thanks Katy Wu for helping me w/ the last shot!

uhohmarty:

Ice Covered Street Lamp on Mt Washington

uhohmarty:

Ice Covered Street Lamp on Mt Washington

cypulchre:

"Iris" by Avelar Lucas

cypulchre:

"Iris" by Avelar Lucas

athelierblackloch:

#Eve Online | The Universe

athelierblackloch:

#Eve Online | The Universe

The Space We Live In (x)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

NGC 5806
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA


Waterspout on Fire by (Sergio Canobbio)

Waterspout on Fire by (Sergio Canobbio)